Kindergarten

  • Module 1

    • Play the license plate game with numbers as you walk through your neighborhood. 
    • Have them look for a 1 on a license plate. Then find a 2, then a 3, and so on.                                                 
    • Write your name and a family member’s name. How many letters are in your name? 
    • How many are in your family member’s name? Which name has more? 
    • Look through a store ad. Cut out numbers 0-20. Put the numbers in order from least to greatest. 
    • Grab a handful of an item, cereal, beans, etc. Estimate how many pieces you grabbed. 
    • Now count them. Was your estimate close? 
    • Estimate how many spoonfuls it takes to finish a bowl of cereal. Count each spoonful as you eat. 
    • Walk around your home. Count how items are plugged into the wall. 
    • Show the number 5 in as many ways as you can. Use pictures and numbers.

     Module 2

    • Look around your home for solid shapes. Name at least 3 solid shapes. 
    • Look around your home for flat shapes. Draw at least three of the shapes. 
    • Look around your home for circles. Count them and record how many you found. 
    • Explore Position words. Use toys to model before, after, above, below, and beside. Describe using attributes. Ex. The blue car is behind the red car. 
    • Sort a bag of skittles or other candy by color. Count each color. What color has the most? What color has the least? 
    • Get three different cups. Put them in order from shortest to tallest. 
    • Sort the mail by name. Who has the least amount of mail? Who has the most amount of mail? 
    • Find 3 objects in the home that are longer than your shoe. 

    Module 3 

    • Trace your foot with chalk outside. Trace a friend’s or family member’s foot too. Which foot is longer?
    • Sort a bag of skittles or other candy by color. Count each color. What color has the most? What color has the least?
    • Get three different cups. Put them in order from shortest to tallest.
    • Sort the mail by name. Who has the least amount of mail? Who has the most amount of mail?
    • Find 3 objects in the home that are longer than your shoe.

    Module 4

    • Use cereal pieces to solve the following problem: Mason has 10 pieces of cereal. He eats 4 pieces. How many pieces are left 
    • How old are you now? Subtract one from that number and record it. Add 3 to that number and record it. 
    • Count backwards from 100. Skip count to 100 by 10s. Which took longer? Write your answer. 
    • Go outside and find two clovers. Write an equation to show how many leaves are on both clovers. 
    • Use some fruit to solve the following problem: Ken has 5 bananas in a bunch. He eats some. There are 3 left. How many bananas did he eat? 
    • Ben had 4 chairs at his kitchen table in the morning. After school there was only 1 chair at the kitchen table. How many chairs are missing?      

First Grade

  • Module 1

    • Roll single-digit numbers and add them together. 
    • Roll 2-digit or 3-digit numbers and add them together. 
    • Add all the digits of your house number together. 
    • Make a train with Legos or colored blocks. Write a number sentence for the different colors in the train. 
    • Add the price of two items at a store. 
    • Compare gas prices to find the lowest amount. 
    • Start with 20 counters (beans, pennies, etc.) and roll two dice to make a 2-digit number. Subtract counters until you get to 0. 
    • Give your student an addition or subtraction number sentence and ask them to make up a story problem to go with the number sentence.
    • Make a physical array with counters and record on paper using symbols 

    Module 2

    • Roll single-digit numbers and add them together. 
    • Roll 2-digit or 3-digit numbers and add them together. 
    • Add all the digits of your house number together. 
    • Make a train with Legos or colored blocks. Write a number sentence for the different colors in the train. 
    • Add the price of two items at a store. 
    • Compare gas prices to find the lowest amount. 
    • Start with 20 counters (beans, pennies, etc.) and roll two dice to make a 2-digit number. Subtract counters until you get to 0. 
    • Give your student an addition or subtraction number sentence and ask them to make up a story problem to go with the number sentence.
    • Make a physical array with counters and record on paper using symbols 

    Module 3

    • Measure the length of various items around the house using different objects (crayons, pennies, etc.)
    • Keep track of your child's growth each month by measuring his/her height using standard and non-standard units of measurement.
    • Talk with your child about specific times that activities occur- eating breakfast, going to school, dinner time, bedtime, etc.
    • Talk about graphs in newspapers and magazines.
    • Take a family survey and make a graph based on the data.
    • Use toothpicks or Popsicle sticks to show tally marks.
    • Create a bar graph based on the amount of time your child reads, plays outside, or watches television.
    • Create a pictograph to show the number of hours of sleep or exercise your family gets each day.    

    Module 4

    • Count objects such as jellybeans in a bowl, pennies in a jar, cheerios in a baggie, etc.
    • Find numbers in newspapers, magazines, or on items around the house.
    • Practice counting with your student while doing various activities-driving in the car, jumping rope, waiting in line at a store, etc.
    • Divide a deck of cards evenly between players. Each player flips over a card, the player with the highest card wins the cards. Continue until one player has all cards in the deck.
    • Put different items into groups and talk about which group has more or less items using the terms greater than and less than.
    • Roll dice and create numbers. Say what is 10 more or 10 less than that number.

    Module 5

    • Go on a shape hunt outside, ask your student to name the shapes of doors, windows, bicycle wheels, etc.
    • Ask your student to identify the shapes of various road signs while traveling in the car.
    • Talk with your student about the various shapes of items packaged in the grocery store.
    • Build with blocks. Discuss what shapes were used to create the structure.

    Module 6

    • Count objects such as jellybeans in a bowl, pennies in a jar, cheerios in a baggie, etc.
    • Find numbers in newspapers, magazines, or on items around the house.
    • Practice counting with your student while doing various activities-driving in the car, jumping rope, waiting in line at a store, etc.
    • Divide a deck of cards evenly between players. Each player flips over a card, the player with the highest card wins the cards. Continue until one player has all cards in the deck.
    • Put different items into groups and talk about which group has more or less items using the terms greater than and less than.
    • Roll dice and create numbers. Say what is 10 more or 10 less than that number.

Second Grade

  • Module 1

    • Roll single digit numbers and add them together.
    • Roll 2-digit or 3-digit numbers and add them together.
    • Add all the digits of your house number together.
    • Make a train with Legos or colored blocks. Write a number sentence for the different colors in the train.
    • Represent two digit numbers with popsicle sticks - make bundles of ten for the tens and use single sticks for the ones. Add the piles together.
    • Use small items (counters, beans, small toys) to represent number sentences. Use index cards to make +, -, <, >, and = symbols. Show a number sentence with a missing element: 7 + ___ = 12. Have your student find the missing addend.

    Module 2

    • Estimate the lengths of various objects around the house, such as a table, a book, a toothbrush, etc. Next, Measure the same objects using a ruler with inches and centimeters to compare the estimate to the actual length.
    •  Measure the four sides of a square or rectangular table using inches, and then add the four sides together to find out how long the table is around.
    • Measure two different book lengths using centimeters. Compare the two lengths and determine how much longer one book is than the other.

    Module 3

    • Skip count when counting groups of nickels and dimes.
    • Count in a pattern while doing a rhythmic or repeated task - stirring pancake batter, brushing hair, putting away groceries, walking.
    • Roll two dice to make a two digit number. Subtract it from 99 or 100.
    • Represent two digit numbers with popsicle sticks - make bundles of ten for the tens and use single sticks for the ones.
    • Roll dice to make two or three digit numbers with a partner. See who can make the larger number.
    • Find or roll numbers and tell which place value each digit represents.

    Module 4

    • Add all of the digits of your house number together.
    • Compare prices of various items (gas, toys, etc) to find the lowest amount.
    • Make numbers or find numbers on labels and compare them.
    • Find or roll numbers and write them in expanded form.
    • Find or roll numbers and tell which place value each digit represents.

    Module 5

    • Roll two dice to make a two digit number. Subtract it from 99 or 100.
    • Add all of the digits of your house number together. 

Third Grade

  • Module 1

    • Make arrays out of household items (e.g., pennies, beans, blocks) Determine how many items are on each row
    • Select multiplication or division facts to illustrate or write a word problem.
    • Hunt for multiple sets of objects in the home. Use repeated addition and multiplication to find the totals.
    • Sort coins according to type, count the number of coins and then multiply to find the total value of pennies (x 1), nickels (x 5), dimes (x 10) and quarters (x 25).
    • Roll 2 number cubes. Find the products of the factors.
    • Count quantities of items by 2's, 3's, 5's, and 10's.
    • Roll 2 number cubes to determine the factors. Make an array to find the product.
    • Act out division problems with counters. For example, Brad has 12 rabbits. He puts the same number of rabbits into each of 4 cages. How many rabbits does Brad put in each cage?
    • Roll 2 number cubes and write the fact families. For example, for rolls of 4 and 6, write: 4 X 6 = 24, 6 X 4 = 24.
    • Ask your child to find the missing factor. For example, 5 X ­­­___ = 35?

    Module 2

    • Roll 2 number cubes. Find the products of the factors.
    • Locate numbers in catalogs or newspapers, then practice rounding them to the nearest tens and hundreds.
    • Make records of important times of the day (wake-up, dinner, going to school, getting home from school, etc.) and practice telling how long between activities.
    • Calculate elapsed time by finding out how long it takes to complete daily activities (soccer practice, homework, take a shower, etc.)
    • Fill a small box with blocks (e.g., sugar cubes) to determine its volume. Brainstorm multiple strategies to determine the volume.

    Module 3

    • Measure the area of the rooms in your home to determine which rooms are the smallest and largest.
    • Use grid paper to make rectangles with the same area.

    Module 4

    • Measure the perimeter and area of the rooms in your home to determine which rooms are the smallest and largest.
    • Use grid paper to make rectangles with the same perimeters. Determine the area of each rectangle.

    Module 5

    • Go on a fraction hunt! Look for household items that are divided into equal parts (fractions of a whole and fractions of a set).  Record the fractions.
    • Roll number cubes to make fractions. Draw pictures of the fractions you make. Place the fractions you've made in order on a number line. 
    • Identify fractions at meal times. For example, you ate 1/2 of an apple, 3/4 stalk of celery,1 whole tuna sandwich, and 2/3 of a glass of milk. 
    • Practice making equivalent fractions. 
    • Plot fractions on a number line.

    Module 6

    • Share and discuss tables and graphs found in newspapers and magazines.
    • Conduct a survey among family members or friends and construct a bar graph or pictograph.
    • Make a physical pictograph using real objects (e.g., fruits, vegetables, cereal, kitchen tools). Record the graph on paper. Change the scale to create a new pictograph.

    Module 7

    • Measure the perimeter and area of the rooms in your home to determine which rooms are the smallest and largest.
    • Use grid paper to make rectangles with the same perimeters. Determine the area of each rectangle.
    • Act out division problems with counters. For example, Brad has 12 rabbits. He puts the same number of rabbits into each of 4 cages. How many rabbits does Brad put in each cage?
    • Use grid paper to create congruent shapes.
    • Identify, describe, and classify different household objects as solid figures.
    • Identify angles that are less than, equal to and greater than right angles.
    • Use tangrams to make plane figures.

Fourth Grade

  • Module 1

    • Make up numbers, roll numbers with dice, or find numbers (on labels) and compare them
    • Find numbers and write them in expanded form
    • Make numbers and tell which place value (and/or value) each digit represents
    • Place large numbers on a number line
    • Collect objects (i.e. Cheerios) and estimate how many
    • Draw pictures and make models of numbers 

    Module 2

    • Use measurement tools when baking or cooking.
    • Compare items by length or weight.
    • Practice scheduling events to determine elapsed time.
    • Use string to measure wrist, neck, and waist and make comparisons.
    • Read an analog clock throughout the day.
    • Use a stopwatch to keep track on how much T.V is watched throughout the week and how much .time is spent on homework, and compare the two amounts of time.
    • Take an object and estimate the weight then use a scale to determine the exact weight, and compare the two amounts.
    • Use a ruler to measure objects around the house in inches or centimeters.
    • Explore the area and volume of a cereal box.

    Module 3

    • Draw shapes and divide into different fractions
    • Create numbers to use in fractions
    • Use measuring cups when baking or cooking
    • Pick numbers to create fractions-Practice simplifying them
    • Make up numbers, roll numbers with dice, or find numbers (on labels) and compare them
    • Find numbers and write them in expanded form
    • Make numbers and tell which place value (and/or value) each digit represents
    • Place large numbers on a number line
    • Collect objects (i.e. Cheerios) and estimate how many
    • Draw pictures and make models of numbers
    • Practice addition and subtraction facts
    • Use centimeter paper to draw decimals.
    • Relate dimes to tenths and pennies to hundredths and make up decimals using dimes and pennies.

    Module 4

    • Find examples of fractions around the house or neighborhood. Add, subtract, multiply, divide or simplify the fractions that you find.
    • Create numbers to use in fractions. Draw these fractions as parts of a whole or set.
    • Use measuring cups when baking or cooking.
    • Identify the use of decimals in sporting events and in newspapers.
    • Draw different shapes. Divide them into different fractions.
    • Practice multiplication and division facts.

Fifth Grade

    • Module 1
      • Create number cubes or spinners and have the student identify the place value and value of different digits in that number. 
      • Roll or pick numbers to create decimals. Add, subtract, multiply, or divide the decimals. 
      • Find the batting averages or other statistics in the sports section of a newspaper and add or subtract the statistics. 
      • Estimate and find the sums and differences of items at the store and in restaurants. 
      • Practice basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts. 
      • Roll or pick numbers to create decimals. Compare and order the numbers. 
      • Choose a four-digit number. Multiply and divide by powers of 10 (10, 100, 1,000, etc.) by moving the decimal point left or right as appropriate.
    • Module 2
      • Create number cubes or spinners and have the student identify the place value and value of different digits in that number. - Estimate and find the sums and differences of items at the store and in restaurants. - Practice basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts.
      • Choose a four-digit number. Multiply and divide by powers of 10 (10, 100, 1,000, etc.) by moving the decimal point left or right as appropriate. 
      • Create number cubes or spinners and have the student identify the place value and value of different digits in that number. 
      • Compare the estimated volume of a carton or bottle of liquid (such as 1/2 gallon juice or milk or two liter bottle of lemonade) in cubic inches or centimeters to its stated volume in ounces or milliliters. - Make up numbers, roll numbers with dice, or find numbers (on labels) and compare them. 
      • Create rules (ex. n = 3) and have your student extend the number pattern (3, 6, _ , _).
      • Create a number pattern and have your student write the rule. - Create an input/ output machine (function table) for a given rule and have the student fill in the missing Inputs and Outputs. 
      • Create an input/ output machine (function table) for an unknown rule and have the student fill in the missing Inputs and Outputs and write the rule. 
      • Find numbers and write them in expanded form. 
      • Draw pictures and make models of numbers. - Practice addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts.
    • Module 3
      • Create or pick numbers to make fractions. Add, subtract, or simplify the fractions that you find.
      • Find examples of fractions around the house or neighborhood. Add, subtract, multiply, divide or simplify the fractions that you find.
      • Create numbers to use in fractions. Draw these fractions as parts of a whole or set. 
      • Use measuring cups when baking or cooking.
      • Draw different shapes. Divide them into different fractions.
    • Module 4
      • Find examples of fractions around the house or neighborhood. Add, subtract, multiply, divide or simplify the fractions that you find. 
      • Create numbers to use in fractions. Draw these fractions as parts of a whole or set. 
      • Use measuring cups when baking or cooking. 
      • Identify the use of decimals in sporting events and in newspapers. 
      • Draw different shapes. Divide them into different fractions. 
      • Practice multiplication and division facts.
    • Module 5
      • Find examples of fractions around the house or neighborhood. Add, subtract, multiply, divide or simplify the fractions that you find. 
      • Draw different shapes. Divide them into different fractions. 
      • Practice multiplication and division facts. 
      • Find the volume of real-world objects in your home. 
      • Compare the estimated volume of a carton or bottle of liquid (such as 1/2 gallon juice or milk or two liter bottle of lemonade) in cubic inches or centimeters to its stated volume in ounces or milliliters. 
      • Name two-dimensional figures and find examples at home. 
      • Draw different polygons within a piece of triangle grid paper, or use combinations of triangles to create other polygons. 
      • Make flash cards of different geometric figures and their properties. 
      • Identify, describe, and different household objects as two-dimensional figures. 
      • Use a compass or a computer to draw geometric figures.  

Sixth Grade

    •  Module One
      • ——Ask your child to show you an example of what they learned in math today.
      • —Help reinforce fast recall of multiplication and division facts by playing math games. Challenge your child to answer more questions the next time they play.
    • —Module Two
      • ——Ask your child what they learned in school that day and have them show you an example.
      • ——Continue reinforcing fast recall of facts.
      • ——Challenge your child to create three different examples of multiplicative inverses using the key words from our module.
    • —Module Three
      • ——Continue asking what we are learning in math and asking your child to show you examples-they really learn so much by explaining the concept to another person.
      • —Ask your child the difference between the opposite of a number and the absolute value of a number.
      • Discuss questions like the following:
        • Where are negative numbers located on a horizontal number line?
        • Where are negative numbers located on a vertical number line?
        • What is the opposite of 2?
        • What is the opposite of 0?
        • Describe the relationship between 10 and -10.
    • Module Four
      • —Continue having your child show examples of what we are learning each day.
      • —Using sets of numbers ask your child to determine the number(s) that make the inequality true.
        • Examples {0, 1, 5, 11, 17}
        • 5h > 40
        • h can be 11 or 17
      • Ask your child to explain the difference between a straight angle and a reflex angle.
    • Module Five
      • Keep asking your child to show you examples of what we are learning each day.
      • Ask your child to explain the difference between a parallelogram and a rectangle
      • —Ask your child to explain the difference between a triangle and a rectangle
      • —Have your child determine possible dimensions for right rectangular prisms with different volumes. Challenge them with dimensions that include fractions in their answers.
    • Module Six
      • Keep continuing to ask your child for examples of what we are working on in class.
      • —Ask your child to create a data set that represents a symmetrical distribution.
      • Ask your child examples and non-examples of statistical questions.
      • How old are the students in my school versus how old am I?
      • Histograms and Dot Plots

    —

Seventh Grade

    • Module One
      • Keep an open mind...your child might teach you something! Discuss the math with your child while you both make sense of it.
      • Discuss a real-life example of how people determine the best buy using unit rates and reasoning skills. You can discuss the problem below or create your own problem.
        • A store is advertising a Back-to-School sale on pencils. A pack of 30 pencils sells for $7.97, whereas a 12-pack of the same brand costs $4.77. Which is the better buy? How do you know?
    • Module Two
      • In this module, your child learned how to play the Integer Game. Ask them to find the missing value of the card below if the total score equals 0. Have them explain how they determined the missing value. 
      • Integer Game Card Image
    • Module Three
      • Ask your child to explain the units used when determining volume and surface area. Why does this make sense?
      • In the example below, Volume and Surface Area of Right Prisms, ask your child to prove the two solutions shown.
      • Discuss with your child the meaning of pi. Why is this ratio so important?
      • volume and surface area of right prisms
    • Module Four
      • If you child struggles with a particular concept in math, be their cheerleader! Be supportive and encourage your child to persevere. They CAN do well in math!
      • Ask your child to calculate the sales price of an item while you are out shopping.
      • When shopping or going out to eat, ask your child to estimate the sales tax or gratuity. 
    • Module Five
      • Ask your child to create an example of something that is certain to happen and another event that is impossible. For example, if there is a bag containing five red crayons and you reached your hand in to grab a crayon, it is certain you will pull out a red crayon.
      • Discuss the importance of random sampling in probability.
    • Module Six
      • Ask your child to find the area of the shaded region of the circle below. Have your child explain how they determined the area.
      • Pi practice problem
  • Eureka Math Presentation

     

    Parent Working at Parent Night

     

    First Grade Presentation

     

    Parent and Student working on Eureka Math